Sri Lankan Tamils Vote in Former War Zone Amid Charges of Intimidation

Saturday, 21 Sep 2013 09:14 AM

 

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JAFFNA, Sri Lanka  — Voters in Sri Lanka thronged polling stations on Saturday in an election that threatens to rekindle animosity between the government and ethnic minority Tamils, four years after the military crushed separatists and ended a 26-year war.

The provincial council election is the first in 25 years in the north, once the heartland of Tamil Tiger separatists. President Mahinda Rajapaksa's government held the poll after facing international pressure to restore democracy.

Defeat for the government would be largely symbolic. But victory for the main Tamil party, the Tamil National Alliance (TNA), could reignite calls for autonomy.

Long lines of patient voters formed at polling stations, most with a holy ash mark on their foreheads, a sign they had attended prayers at Hindu temples.

Many voters called for restitution of land, the departure of the national army, accused of human rights abuses in the final stages of the war, and some even for a separate state.

Many were clearly keen to elect their own local leaders for the first time in three decades. But some candidates complained of intimidation and irregularities.

"Tamils need independence. We need our lands back. We need the right to move freely," said Gopalasuthanthiran Pushpavathi, a 51-year mother of four, after voting at a polling station behind the imposing Nallur Temple.

"I am happy that we have six votes in my family and we cast the votes with the hope of getting a separate province that is ruled by ourselves," said Kandiah Thiyagarajah, 63.

Local election monitors said a vehicle of a TNA candidate was reported to have been shot at. 

PLENTY OF COMPLAINTS

The Center for Monitoring Election Violations (CMEV) said the house of a TNA polling agent was burned and some voters were intimidated in Mullaitivu district, where thousands of Tamil people were said to have killed in May 2009.

"Specific incidents where voters have been intimidated, allegedly by ruling party politicians and the military, have resulted in fear among voters in these locations," the Center said.

The military rejects any suggestion of involvement by the security forces in violence of any sort.

A foreign observer said polling went off well in polling centers in Jaffna.

"But there have been many cases of intimidation reported outside the polling centers," the observer told Reuters on condition of anonymity.

Many expect an overwhelming victory for the TNA, the former political proxy of the defeated rebels, who launched the war for a separate state to end what Tamil activists saw as systematic discrimination by Sri Lanka's Sinhalese majority.

Rajapaksa has a majority of more than two-thirds in parliament and controls the eight other provinces. He appears determined to win in the north, where campaign posters for the ruling coalition plastered the walls.

The president has faced international pressure to bring to book those accused of war crimes committed at the end of the war, and to boost reconciliation efforts.

His government has rejected accusations of rights abuses and Rajapaksa in July ordered an inquiry into mass disappearances, mostly of Tamils, at the end of the war.

© 2014 Thomson/Reuters. All rights reserved.

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